Tuesday, 26 September 2017

Yazd

Yazd Gallery

Yazd is the capital of Yazd Province, Iran, and a centre of Zoroastrian culture. The city is located 270 km (170 mi) southeast of Isfahan. At the 2006 census, the population was 423,006, in 114,716 families. Because of generations of adaptations to its desert surroundings, Yazd is an architecturally unique city. It is also known in Iran for the high quality of its handicrafts, especially silk weaving, and its confectionary.The city has a history of over 3,000 years, dating back to the time of the Median empire, when it was known as "Ysatis" (or "Issatis"). The present city name has however been derived from Yazdegerd I, a Sassanid ruler. The city was definitely a Zoroastrian centre during Sassanid times. After the Arab Islamic conquest of Persia, people periodically faced extreme religious oppression including forced conversions, massacres, harassment, and other forms of discrimination, and then many fled to Yazd from neighbouring provinces. By paying a levy, Yazd remained Zoroastrian even after its conquest, and Islam only gradually became the dominant religion in the city.Because of its remote desert location and the difficulty of approach, Yazd had remained largely immune to large battles and the destruction and ravages of war. For instance, it was a haven for those fleeing from destruction in other parts of Persia during the invasion of Genghis Khan. It was visited by Marco Polo in 1272, who remarked on the city's fine silk-weaving industry. In the book 'The Travels of Marco Polo', he described Yazd in the following way: "It is a good and noble city, and has a great amount of trade. They weave there quantities of a certain silk tissue known as Yasdi, which merchants carry into many quarters to dispose of. When you leave this city to travel further, you ride for seven days over great plains, finding harbour to receive you at three places only. There are many fine woods producing dates upon the way, such as one can easily ride through; and in them there is great sport to be had in hunting and hawking, there being partridges and quails and abundance of other game, so that the merchants who pass that way have plenty of diversion. There are also wild asses, handsome creatures. At the end of those seven marches over the plain, you come to a fine kingdom which is called Kerman." 

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Historic Tourist Attractions In Yazd :

Towers of Silence


Towers of Silence


A Dakhma , also known as "Cheel Ghar" in Hindi and "Tower of Silence" in English, is a circular, raised structure used by Zoroastrians for exposure of the dead, particularly to scavenging birds for the purposes of excarnation. Distant view of Tower of Silence, Malabar Hills, Mumbai. Entry to the hill is strictly prohibited for non-Parsees. The type of construction is not specified by the name. The common dakhma or dokhma (from Middle Persian dakhmag) originally denoted any place for the dead. Similarly, in the medieval texts of Zoroastrian tradition, the word astodan appears, but today that word denotes an ossuary. In the Iranian provinces of Yazd and Kerman, the technical term is deme or dema. In India, the term doongerwadi came into use after a tower was constructed on a hill of that name. The word dagdah appears in the texts of both India and Iran but, in 20th-century India, signified the lowest grade of temple fire (cf. Fire temple)

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Fire Temple


Fire Temple


A fire temple in Zoroastrianism is the place of worship for Zoroastrians, often called dar-e mehr (Persian) or agiyari (Gujarati). In the Zoroastrian religion, fire (see Atar), together with clean water (see Aban), are agents of ritual purity. Clean, white "ash for the purification ceremonies [is] regarded as the basis of ritual life," which "are essentially the rites proper to the tending of a domestic fire, for the temple [fire] is that of the hearth fire raised to a new solemnity"First evident in the 4th century BCE, the Zoroastrian cult of fire is much younger than Zoroastrianism itself. It appears at approximately the same time as the shrine cult and is roughly contemporaneous with the introduction of Atar as a divinity. There is no allusion to a temple cult of fire in the Avesta proper, nor is there any old Persian language word for one.

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Dowlat Abad Garden


Dowlat Abad Garden


Dowlatabad Garden located in Yazd, central Iran, is a Persian architecture jewels. The Garden is an authentic Iranian garden that annually attracts thousands of domestic and foreign tourists. This is a complex built according to the original Iranian architectural style and consists of a large garden and some buildings. Looking at the garden and the main entrance of the garden, you will see the long pool in the shade of the tall cypress trees leading to the main entrance. On the way to the mansion, there are beautiful grapes and pomegranates trees behind those tall trees. Before you see the garden or even the walls of the house, from hundreds of meters away and some streets away from that spot, you can see the tallest wind catcher of the mansion inside the garden. This traditional air-conditioning system of local houses around the desert in Iran is the essential elements at the residential structures. However, the exaggerated grand size of this wind catcher functioned perfectly well. 

Jame Mosque


Jame Mosque


The Jāmeh Mosque of Yazd is the grand, congregational mosque (Jāmeh) of Yazd city, within the Yazd Province of Iran. The mosque is depicted on the obverse of the Iranian 200 rials banknote. The 12th-century mosque is still in use today. It was first built under Ala'oddoleh Garshasb of the Al-e Bouyeh dynasty. The mosque was largely rebuilt between 1324 and 1365, and is one of the outstanding 14th century buildings of Iran.The mosque is a fine specimen of the Azari style of Persian architecture. The mosque is crowned by a pair of minarets, the highest in Iran, and the portal's facade is decorated from top to bottom in dazzling tile work, predominantly blue in colour. Within is a long arcaded courtyard where, behind a deep-set south-east iwan, is a sanctuary chamber (shabestan). This chamber, under a squat tiled dome, is exquisitely decorated with faience mosaic: its tall faience Mihrab, dated 1365, is one of the finest of its kind in existence.

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Water Museum


Water Museum


Referred to as the city of underground aqueducts, Yazd is a home to Water Museum where exhibits of water storage vessels and historical technologies related to water are showcased.Yazd water museum was set up in 2000 in the wake of the first international conference on qanat in Yazd. The museum building has once been a merchant’s house built in 1929. Two qanats are running beneath the museum at different levels, which are reachable through a special stairway called Payab. This museum has put on display a variety of water objects from qanat to water ownership documents. Some parts of the house structure represent some parts of water history in the region. For example the stairway to qanat or a reservoir on the roof can show how water technologies and everyday life have been interwoven in the past. The museum is one of the best tourist destinations in Yazd, which receive hundreds of visitors every day.

 

Alexander's Prison


Alexander's Prison


This 15th-century domed school is known as Alexander's Prison because of a reference to this apparently dastardly place in a Hafez poem. The story goes that during the reign of Alexander the Macedonian,a number of Iranian elite resisting his domination went on an uprising in Rey ( Near Tehran). He had them arrested, and on his way through Yazd imprisoned them in a dungeon which refers to a deep well in the courtyard of this building. There is a display of Yazd old city inside. The nearby 11th-Century brick Tomb of the 12 Imeams is almost next door. The inscriptions inside boast the names of each of the Shiite Imams, none of whom are buried here.

 

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