Sunday, 19 February 2017

Tehran

Tehran is the capital of Iran and Tehran Province since 1778. With a population of around 8.3 million and surpassing 14 million in the wider metropolitan area, Tehran is Iran's largest city and urban area, and the largest city in Western Asia. In the 20th and 21st centuries, Tehran has been the subject of mass migration of people from all around Iran. The city is home to many historic mosques, churches, synagogues and Zoroastrian fire temples. However, modern structures, notably Azadi (Liberty) Tower and the Milad Tower, have come to symbolise the city. Tehran is ranked 29th in the world by the population of its metropolitan area. Throughout Iran's history, the capital has been moved many times, and Tehran is the 32nd national capital of Iran although it has been Iran's capital for 240 years. Although a variety of unofficial languages are spoken, roughly 99% of the population understand and speak Persian. The majority of people in Tehran identify themselves as Persians. In pre-Islamic and early Islamic times, Tehran was an unimportant village and part of the area of present-day Tehran was occupied by Rey (which in the Avesta occurs in the form of Rhaga), now a part of the city of Tehran, which took over its role after the destruction of Rey by the Mongols in the early 13th century.An important historical city in the area of modern-day Tehran, now absorbed by it, is known as Rey, which is etymologically connected to the Old Persian and Avestan Rhages. The city was a major area of the Iranian speaking Medes and Achaemenids. Tehran became the capital of Iran in 1778. In the Zoroastrian Avesta, Videvdad, i, 15, Ragha is mentioned as the twelfth sacred place created by Ahura-Mazda. In the Old Persian inscriptions, Ragha appears as a province. From Ragha, Darius the Great sent reinforcements to his father Hystaspes (Vishtaspa), who was putting down the rebellion in Parthia .

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Historic Tourist Attractions In Tehran :

Bagh-e Irani Park


Bagh-e Irani Park


Bagh-e Irani Park ( Persian garden Park ) is located in Sheikh Bahaee Avenue, designed based on the pattern of Persian garden. Other feature of this park is passages for disabilities traffic. The park has two doors with beautiful entrance; on the east and west sides Around 2/5 acres are dedicated to green space; old trees have been preserved in this plan. Other species such as barberry, Pyracantha a variety of rose and eglantine, seasoned and perennial plants have been added to the park. Restaurant and teahouse, six separate fountain, public library with a separate reading room for men and woman, children`s playground, sports ground, bathroom and dressing room, a bathroom equipped for disabilities, prayer room, a water tank, are the structure and facilities of the park.

National Museum of Iran


National Museum of Iran


The National Museum of Iran is a museum in Tehran, Iran. It is the combination of two museums, the old Muze-ye Irân-e Bâstân ("Archaeological Museum of Iran", a brick, Sasanian revival building designed by André Godard and inaugurated in 1937), and the modernistic white travertine National Arts Museum , inaugurated in 1972. The second structure, built on the grassy grounds of the old Archaeological Museum, went through quite a few, and hasty changes of the interior, and was still being remodeled when the Islamic Revolution swept the country in 1979.While the old museum always had a clear mandate to show archaeological relics (to also include some rare medieval textiles and rug pieces), the new museum began its life by featuring the exquisite Amlash pottery from the prehistoric Caspian Sea regions of Iran.

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Darakeh


Darakeh


If you are a mountain person and love a good trek or hike then head to Darakeh, a village in the north-eastern part of Tehran where several trails into the mountains will leave you spoilt for choice. All the trails are dotted with gurgling streams and gushing waterfalls brought to life mostly by melting snow.If all that hiking and the long trek leaves you tired and in need of some breathing space then by all means stop, look around and take in the beauty of the landscape. You can also kick off your shoes, perch yourself atop some rocks and dip your feet in to the cool water. The tingling sensation that runs through your body is just the thing to make you feel alive!While you are in Darakeh, do take the opportunity to experience life in a Persian village.

Museum of Contemporary Art


Museum of Contemporary Art


The Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, is an art museum in Tehran, Iran. The museum was designed by Iranian architect Kamran Diba, who employed elements from traditional Persian architecture. It was built adjacent to Laleh Park, Tehran, and was inaugurated in 1977. The building itself can be regarded as an example of contemporary art. Most of the museum area is located underground. Garden of Sculptures, near the museum It is considered to have the most valuable collection of Western modern art outside Europe and the United States, a collection largely assembled by founding curators David Galloway and Donna Stein under the patronage of Farah Pahlavi. It is said that there is approximately £2.5 billion worth of modern art held at the museum. The museum hosts a revolving programme of exhibitions and occasionally organises exhibitions by local artists.

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Bagh-e Ferdows


Bagh-e Ferdows


Bāgh-e Ferdows , also known as Emārat-e Bāgh-e Ferdows and The Mohammadieh Palace, is a historical palace in Tajrish, Shemiran, North Tehran, between Zafaraniyeh and Jafar Ābād. It is part of a palace complex consisting of two castles, the North Castle and the South Castle, of which the former has decayed. Since 2002, it houses Film Museum of Iran. The complex was originally designed by Hāji Mirzā Āqāsi, a Sufi believer and the Prime Minister of Mohammad Shah Qajar. It was used as a summer residence by the Qajar family and some nobility. Mohammad Shah Qajar died here in September 1848 and the complex became disused in subsequent years.During the reign of the Nasser ad-Din Shah Qajar (1848–1896), the ownership of the compound was transferred to Dust-'Ali Khan Nezām od-Dauleh Mo'ayyer ol-Mamālek, who refurbished the palaces and gave the place the name Ferdows.

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Azadi Tower


Azadi Tower


The Azadi Tower, previously known as the Shahyād Āryāmehr, is one of the symbols of Tehran City, the capital of Iran, and marks the west entrance to the city.The architect, Hossein Amanat, won a competition to design the monument, which combines elements of Sassanid and Islamic architecture. Amanat, a Baha'i, was driven from the country by the revolution against the Shah of Iran and the removal of religious pluralism. It is part of the Azadi cultural complex, located in Tehran's Azadi Square in an area of some 50,000 m². There are several fountains around the base of the tower and a museum underground. The iconic Monument des Martyrs in Algiers (built, 1982) shows a strong influence by this monument, in its general design as well as its details.

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Darband


Darband


Darband was formerly a village close to Tajrish, Shemiran, and is now a neighbourhood inside Tehran's city limits. It is the beginning of a very popular hiking trail into the Alborz mountain Tochal, which towers over Tehran. A chair lift is also available for those not interested in hiking. The Persian word means gateway or door (dar) of the mountain (band, a variation of vand and fand, meaning mountain). Darband is where many Iranian giants of art and culture such as Iraj Mirza, Mohammad Taghi Bahar, Forough Farrokhzad, Abolhasan Saba, Ruhollah Khaleghi, Rahi Moayeri, and Darvish-khan are buried (Zahir o-dowleh cemetery). Darband has a suitable climate all year round, and sees heavy snowfall every year.The initial start of the trail at Darband is about 250 metres long and is dotted with a number of small cafes and restaurants.

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Dar ul-Funun


Dar ul-Funun


Dar ul-Funun (English: Polytechnic), established in 1851, was the first modern university and modern institution of higher learning in Persia.Founded by Amir Kabir, then the royal vizier to Nasereddin Shah, the Shah of Iran, Dar al-Funun originally was conceived as a polytechnic to train upper-class Persian youth in Medicine, Engineering, Military Science, and Geology. It was similar in scope and purpose to American land grant colleges like Purdue and Texas A&M. Like them, it developed and expanded its mission over the next hundred years, eventually becoming the University of Tehran.The institute was planned by the Iranian educated Mirza Reza Mohandes, and built by the architect Muhammad Taqi-khan Memar-Bashi under the supervision of the Qajari prince Bahram Mirza. Facilities such as an assembly hall, a theater, library, cafeteria, and a publishing house were built for the institute.

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Milad Tower


Milad Tower


Milad Tower, also known as Tehran Tower, is a multi-purpose Iranian concrete tower built in 2007 in between the Shahrak-e Gharb and Gisha districts of Tehran. It stands at 435 m (1,427 ft) from base to the tip of the antenna.[5] The head consists of a large pod with 12 floors, the roof of which is at 315 m (1,033 ft). Below this is a staircase and elevators to reach the area. Milad Tower is the sixth tallest tower in the world after the Tokyo Skytree, Canton Tower in Guangzhou, CN Tower in Toronto, Ostankino Tower in Moscow, the Oriental Pearl Tower in Shanghai. It is also the 17th tallest freestanding structure in the world. Milad Tower is a part of The Tehran International Trade and Convention Centre. The project includes the Milad telecommunication tower offering restaurants at the top with panoramic views of Tehran, a five-star hotel, a convention centre, a world trade centre, and an IT park.

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Golestan Palace


Golestan Palace


The Golestan Palace, also spelled Gulistan Palace, literally the Roseland Palace, is the former royal Qajar complex in Iran's capital city, Tehran.The oldest of the historic monuments in Tehran, a world heritage, the Golestan Palace belongs to a group of royal buildings that were once enclosed within the mud-thatched walls of Tehran’s Historic Arg (citadel).The Tehran’s Historic Arg was built during the reign of Tahmasp I (r. 1524-1576) of the Safavid dynasty (1502–1736), and was later renovated by Karim Khan of Zand (r. 1750-1779). Agha Mohammad Khan of Qajar (1742–1797) chose Tehran as his capital. The Arg became the site of the Qajar (1794–1925). The Court and the Golestan Palace became the official residence of the royal Qajar family. The palace was rebuilt to its current form in 1865 by Haji Ab ol Hasan Mimar Navai.

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